Angelica (Medical)

Angelica (Medical)

It is used internally to help deal with digestive problems and cramps and to counter reduced urine production and the tendency to produce kidney stones. Externally, it is good to use on bruises and varicose veins.

It is used internally to help deal with digestive problems and cramps and to counter reduced urine production and the tendency to produce kidney stones. Externally, it is good to use on bruises and varicose veins.

Latin name

Angelica archangelica (scientific name: Angelica officinalis Moench; family: Apiaceae)

Other common name

angelica, European angelica, garden angelica, Root of the Holy Spirit, herb of angels, wild celery

Hand skimmed part

root, fruits (Angelicae radix, Angelicae fructus)

Use

It is used internally for digestive problems (bad digestion, flatulence), for cramps, slowed down bowel movements, with reduced urine production and the tendency to produce kidney stones. Externally, angelica is used on bruises and blood welts, for skin infections on the scalp, for visible and septic varicose veins and on burns. It is a suitable ingredient in a number of products used by the elderly. It is used as an anti-bacterial ingredient and to counter certain types of mold. Furanocoumarins in Angelica impact the pharmacokinetics of co-ingested drugs and can in the first phase slow down the rate at which certain types of drugs exit the body; in the second phase, they speed up this rate. Similar types of angelicas (A sinensis) have a prophylactic effect on the liver and they prevent the lowering of the content of stored polysaccharides of glycogen in the liver. In folk medicine, angelica was also used for its antiseptic properties and it is an effective expectorant and emmenagogue (promoting menstruation) and it is also used to deal with neurologically caused insomnia. Here angelica was introduced in the Middle Ages with monks planting it to combat the plague.

Content substances

Essential oils (main components are: alpha and beta phellandrene, alpha-pinene, delta-karen, sesquiter-penes, coumarins).

Collection time

root - October, fruits - September

Character

The dried root and rhizome, without the remains of the above-ground parts of the plant, has a very spicy aroma and the taste is sharp and a bit sour. The rhizome is short and up to 5 cm wide; it is softly and densely scalloped along its surface; on the top of it, it often has the remains of reddish leaf sheathes. There are many roots and they are up to 30 cm in length and 1 cm in width; they are interlocked. On the surface, the roots have deep longitudinal scars and around their circumference, the roots are nubby. The thin roots are dense and very softly intertwined. The lower leaves of the plant are large with a major rib running their length, they are 2-3 times pinnately divided, the stem leaves alternate and they are attached to the stem by sheathes. The inflorescence creates two hemispherical umbels. The flowers are bisexual, pentamerous and greenish. The fruits are double achene and have ridges with a broad wing. The rhizomes with the roots are collected in the fall or spring. It is easy for the drug to absorb moisture and for it to be attacked by insects and parasites.

Angelica (Medical) In teas

Leros Stomaran